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i-Technology 2008 Predictions: Where's RIAs, AJAX, SOA and Virtualization Headed in 2008?

SYS-CON's Annual i-Technology Predictions Round-Up

The reinvention of enterprise software.Java market fragmentation . OSGi bundles . Microkernel-based architectures

ERIC NEWCOMER
CTO, Iona Technologies

Eric Newcomer leads IONA's participation in all standardization activities, and has been involved in Web services standardization activities from the beginning. As Chief Technology Officer he is responsible for directing and communicating IONA's technology roadmap, as well as its product strategy as it relates to standards adoption, architecture, and product design.

1. The large Internet businesses will become a big inspiration for enterprise software innovation as software vendors start to develop products based on requirements from Google, eBay, Amazon, PayPal, et al. This trend will result in the reinvention of enterprise software, and during 2008 this trend will become clear.  The traditional middleware products such as J2EE application servers and relational database management systems were developed to handle the load of any business. But the Internet load is much greater than this, as are the requirements to be always available. The old centralized, mainframe based software designs are being rethought, using the cheapest computers and disks possible to achieve the highest possible levels of scalability, performance, and reliability. During 2008 what is happening here will become generally understood.

2. In the Java market fragmentation will increase rather than lessen. The recent split between JBI and SCA, and the disagreements over Java EE 6 and OSGi will escalate tensions as the pressure increases on BEA/Oracle, IBM, and Sun to take market share from each other in a diminishing market. Meanwhile, Microsoft has an opportunity to grow stronger behind the leadership of Ray Ozzie and is likely to surprise those who believe the battle for the enterprise is over and Java has already won.  

3.  Specifications and reference implementations for the enterprise edition of OSGi software will be completed, laying the foundation for the most significant change in the Java market since the emergence of the Spring Framework, although Sun is likely to continue to oppose it. J2EE application servers will finally become more modularized (buy only what you need) and Java developers will be able to think about enterprise applications in terms of a combination of OSGi bundles, some developed by the user and others supplied by vendors - all of which work seamlessly together and support dynamic deployment and update capabilities.

4.  Resource oriented computing, aka REST, will finally start to gain serious traction (see also No. 1), although its rabid adherents won't be satisfied with what will be less than total domination (yes Virginia, people will still be using Web services, too).  Vendor and user support is on the rise, and more and more people will understand how to take advantage of this powerful architecture. Enterprise applications will start to include both service oriented and resource oriented capabilities. OSGi based infrastructures (see also No. 3) will help the Java world combine both sensibly.

5.  Microkernel-based architectures and lightweight containers will grow in popularity as people gain experience with SOA based project design, development, and deployment and understand the benefits of "just the right amount of software for an SOA."  SOA deployment strategies based on grid and virtualization technologies will also become widely adopted, since lightweight containers lend are well suited to them, although the industry will continue to fight over the definition of "grid" since Oracle and IBM have widely divergent approaches.  

6. The battle for social networking prominence will be played out in 2008 as MySpace, Facebook, Plaxo, and LinkedIn position themselves for enterprise use.  As the "IM generation" enters the workforce they are going to expect in the corporate environment support for familiar social networking technologies, encouraging corporations to figure out how to incorporate them into business culture, but one or perhaps two winners will emerge from the battle in 2008.  Meanwhile expect employees to hedge their bets by taking out pages on multiple sites, causing confusion in the short term over which site to favor. .

See next pages for predictions from: Bill Roth, BEA Systems; Brad Abrams, Microsoft; Kevin Hoffman, iPhone Developer's Journal; Ian Thain, Sybase; Yakov Fain, Farata Systems.

More Stories By Jeremy Geelan

Jeremy Geelan is Chairman & CEO of the 21st Century Internet Group, Inc. and an Executive Academy Member of the International Academy of Digital Arts & Sciences. Formerly he was President & COO at Cloud Expo, Inc. and Conference Chair of the worldwide Cloud Expo series. He appears regularly at conferences and trade shows, speaking to technology audiences across six continents. You can follow him on twitter: @jg21.

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Most Recent Comments
Don Babcock 01/08/08 10:40:10 AM EST

The one technology that didn't even get mentioned in this list of "the next big things" and prognostications is rules engine technology. Rules engine technology is to "M" and and to some extent the "C" parts of MVC (which was mentioned in several ways) what the word processor is to writing and the database engine is to information storage and retrieval. The potential for "mashups" and the like is HUGE. Writing code with meta descriptions and code generators can only get you incremental improvements in productivity. Rules Engines can deliver (they have for us) order of magnitude productivity/reliability improvement. I guess they are still below the radar of the pundit prognosticators for 2008.

Ruslan 01/02/08 03:17:14 AM EST

Extra space in this URL

http://www.w3.org/ 2001/tag/

produces 404.

Alessandro Stagni's Weblog 12/30/07 07:09:08 PM EST

Trackback Added: Sarà il 2008 l'anno della "Unifed Communication"?; Nel mare magnum delle previsioni per l'anno nuovo segnalo (per il momento) queste pubblicate dal .NET Developers' Journal. Where's AJAX, SOA and Virtualization Headed in 2008? — 2007 was the undoubtedly the year of Social Networking, but what of 2008?

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