Click here to close now.




















Welcome!

IBM Cloud Authors: Carmen Gonzalez, Elizabeth White, XebiaLabs Blog, Liz McMillan, Pat Romanski

Related Topics: IBM Cloud

IBM Cloud: Article

Examining the Programming Model Extensions

Within IBM WebSphere Application Server version 6

Back in version 4 of IBM WebSphere Application Server (WAS), IBM released the Enterprise Edition of WAS. In version 5, IBM continued to release the Enterprise Edition (later renamed IBM WebSphere Business Integration Server Foundations in v5.1) with even more functionality. In version 5, the heart of the Enterprise Edition functionality was process choreographer, a Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE)-based workflow engine. However, the Enterprise Edition also contains a slew of other technology sometimes referred to as the WAS Programming Model Extensions (PME). The goal of these programming model extensions is to provide solutions to problems that are difficult and sometimes impossible to solve using existing J2EE technology.

In WAS v5, customers needed to upgrade to the Enterprise Edition to benefit from WAS PMEs, leaving a large portion of WAS developers out of luck. However, in version 6 most of the PMEs have now been included in all editions of WAS. This means that all WebSphere version 6 users can benefit from these extensions without upgrading to a higher end workflow engine.

In this article, I will go over some of these WAS PMEs. I will discuss each PME in terms of the problem it solves. In addition, I'll talk about the work being done to add some of these extensions to future versions of the J2EE specification.

Overview of Extensions

In order to put some structure around this article, I am going to categorize the extensions by their problem space:
  • Multi-threading and scheduling extensions
  • Transactional enhancements and EJB entity bean extensions
  • Other extensions

Multi-threading and Scheduling

In this section, I am going to discuss some of the WAS PME features in the multi-threading and scheduling space.

Asynchronous Beans and CommonJ Work Manager
The J2EE platform shields developers from low-level system coding such as multithreaded programming. For that reason, there are many restrictions in the J2EE programming model when it comes to multithreading. For example, in J2EE 1.4, it is illegal to create your own Java threads in a J2EE container. WAS has no knowledge of these threads so it cannot propagate things such as a security context. In addition, because plain Java threads are random they cannot be managed by a thread pool; without someway to manage these threads, applications can lose control of machine resources. However, there are certain use cases that could benefit from the ability to do work asynchronously. Traditionally in J2EE such use cases are implemented with the Java Messaging Service (JMS). JMS forces you to define destinations, create messages, and code message driven beans to consume messages. JMS is a great platform for doing asynchronous work, especially for integration scenarios, but, in certain situations all a developer wants to do is accomplish concurrent processing. For example, you may have a use case where an application needs to retrieve data from two or three back end independent data sources. In order to speed up performance, the application could run these queries concurrently. With JMS, this is quite complex to write. However, WAS provides a framework (called asynchronous beans) of classes that allow programmers to have work executed on separate threads. In addition, asynchronous beans can also have activities performed in response to alarms or events. At the same time, it ensures that these activities are executed using the "logically correct" J2EE context. This model represents a very interesting compromise between the loosely coupled approach used with messaging and the tightly coupled approach of traditional J2EE programming that requires a single thread of execution.

WAS developers can create asynchronous beans instead of Java threads. Asynchronous beans allow a developer to code the work to be done on a separate thread. (It is important to note that because of work being done to standardize asynchronous beans, the asynchronous bean framework is also referred to as CommonJ WorkManager. This means that there are two APIs, one in com.ibm package referred to as asynchronous bean API, and the other in the commonj package referred to as CommonJ WorkManager API. For the purpose of this article we will refer to asynchronous beans and CommonJ WorkManager interchangeably; they are both configured the same way.) There are three types of asynchronous beans:

  • Work objects: Instances of classes that implement a special work interface. Essentially, the Work interface is the same as the Java runnable interface. However, Work instances can be submitted to a WorkManager (discussed below) for asynchronous execution. Unlike a plain runnable, Work inherits the J2EE context of their creator rather than the J2EE context of the thread pool where they actually run. Works allow a J2EE component to run operations in the background and asynchronously. The code that runs in the background behaves as if it were part of the J2EE application that instantiated the work.
  • Event listeners: These listeners are also asynchronous by nature. An application can create an event listener and subscribe to events. When the event occurs, the listener will be notified and will run the logic to handle the event. The problem with listeners in a J2EE container is that, since the listener runs asynchronously in its own thread, it won't be able to use the J2EE context of the subscriber. The asynchronous beans provide a generic notification framework that allows a J2EE component to subscribe a listener to generic events and have the listener execute its logic under the same J2EE context of the subscriber.
  • Timer listeners: (Not to be confused with EJB timers described later.) Special listeners that will be fired when a timer goes off. In the asynchronous bean framework, a timer can be created by a J2EE application. The listener will be invoked on a separate thread and it will inherit the same J2EE context as the timer creator. The code sample below shows an example of a timer.

    
    public class StockQuoteTimerListener implements TimerListener {
    	String context; 
    	String url;
    	  public StockQuoteTimerListener(String context, String url){
    	     this.context = context;
    	     This.url = url;
    	  }
    	  public void timerExpired(Timer timer) {
    	     System.out.println("Timer fired. Context ="+ 
    		 ((StockQuoteTimerListener)timer.getTimerListener()).getContext());
    
    	}
    	   public String getContext() {
    	    return context;
    	   }
    	}
    

    Timers are not persistent in WAS. If you need persistent services, the WAS scheduler or EJB timer service should be used. (In version 5, the Enterprise Edition provided alarms instead of timers. Timers are a replacement for alarms but the alarms are still supported.)

    As I mentioned, the J2EE context can flow from one J2EE component to another as long as they are called on the same thread. The asynchronous bean framework makes it possible to transfer all or some of the context to separate threads. The administrator can also configure which parts of the context are going to be transferred when a WorkManager is created. The following contexts can optionally be configured to propagate:

    • Security (J2EE security context)
    • Work area (another WAS PME explained later in this article)
    • Internationalization context (another WAS PME explained later in this article)
    • Application profiling definitions (another WAS PME explained later in this article)
    In addition, the java:comp/env local namespace is always passed along with asynchronous beans.

    Due to the asynchronous nature of this programming model, transactional contexts are not passed to the asynchronous beans. The asynchronous beans get their own local transaction, or they can start global transactions if XA resources are involved.

    Asynchronous beans should stay away from caching connections. They can cache connection factories and then get a connection, use it, and release it at the end of the asynchronous execution. That way connection pooling is used correctly.

    The WorkManager is the heart of the asynchronous bean framework. A WorkManager is essentially a thread pool. It runs Work instances asynchronously and controls the transfer of J2EE contexts to those threads. The WorkManager is the anchor point that allows developers to create asynchronous beans. Applications will look up the WorkManagers using JNDI. Once an application has obtained a WorkManager, it can use it, for example, to submit Work instances. The WorkManager returns a WorkItem to the application, which can use it to monitor the progress of the work. Applications can define resource references to work managers.

    For timers, timer managers are configured on the server much the same way as work managers (see Figure 1).

    The asynchronous bean framework is the basis for two new JSRs which have been submitted jointly by IBM and BEA. These are JSR 236 (Timers for Application Servers) and JSR 237 (Work Managers for Application Servers).

    For further information on asynchronous beans, see the following link: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/ws60help/index.jsp?topic=/ com.ibm.websphere.nd.doc/info/ae/ae/welc6tech_asb.html.

    Scheduler Service
    Prior to J2EE 1.4, the J2EE specification defined no solution for scheduling. Applications that required scheduling to run batch jobs or scheduled events needed to do so outside the application server. In version 5, WAS introduced the scheduler service in the Enterprise Edition. Applications could now write batch jobs and scheduled events that ran inside an application server. Batch applications could now benefit from container managed transactions and J2EE security. A developer just had to provide a stateless session bean class and use the provided home and remote interface. A scheduler would then be configured administratively. Tasks could be scheduled using the scheduler API either in Java code or wsadmin. The scheduler service continues to function in WAS Application Server version 6. Figure 2 shows the administrative console screen for creating a scheduler.

    Applications can then treat the scheduler as a resource and create tasks as shown:

    	
    //lookup Scheduler as a Resource
    context = new InitialContext();
    
    Object schedulerObj =
    context.lookup("java:comp/
    env/scheduler/MyScheduler");
    
    scheduler = (Scheduler) schedulerObj;
    
    //Lookup Task Handler as an EJB
    Object taskHandlerObj = context.lookup("java:comp/
    env/ejb/StockTickerPublisher");
    taskHandlerHome =
    (TaskHandlerHome) PortableRemoteObject.narrow(
    taskHandlerObj,
    TaskHandlerHome.class);
    //Create Task
    taskInfo = scheduler.createBeanTaskInfo();
    //Associate TaskHandler with Task
    taskInfo.setTaskHandler(taskHandlerHome);
    taskInfo.setStartTimeInterval(startInterval
    + "minutes");
    taskInfo.setRepeatInterval(repeatInterval + "minutes");
    taskInfo.setNumberOfRepeats(repeats);
    taskInfo.setName(taskName);
    //Create Task in Scheduler
    TaskStatus status = scheduler.create(taskInfo);
    

    WAS provides the home and remote interface for the task handler object. Developers only need to provide a bean class with a special process method:

    
    //Example task handler
    public void process(TaskStatus taskStatus)
    {
    	try
    	{
    		publisherBO.publishStockTicker();
    	}
    	catch (StockException e)
    	{
    		throw new EJBException(e.getLocalizedMessage(),e);
    	}
    }
    

    In J2EE 1.4, the EJB timer service is introduced to the specification. The EJB timer service allows any EJB component that implements the TimerObject interface to be called by some scheduling component. Any EJB type can be used (session bean, entity bean, or message driven bean) as a timed object. The timer service also defines a standard interface called TimerService for scheduling events. In version 6, the EJB timed objects is a special type of WAS TaskHandler. So the EJB timed components build upon the same scheduling infrastructure provided in version 6. By default, an internal scheduler instance is used to manage those tasks, and they are persisted to a Cloudscape database associated with the server process.

    The EJB timer service can be configured on the desired server (see Figure 3).

    You can choose to use the default pre-configured scheduler or your own (see Figure 4).

    Any EJB type can implement the TimedObject interface and implement the ejbTimeout() method:

    
    import javax.ejb.Timer;
    import javax.ejb.TimedObject;
    import javax.ejb.TimerService;
    
    public class MyBean implements SessionBean, TimedObject {
    
      // This method is called by the EJB container upon Timer expiration.
      public void ejbTimeout(Timer theTimer) {
    
        // Any code typically placed in an EJB method can be placed here.
    
         String whyWasICalled = (String) Timer.getInfo():
         System.out.println("I was called because of"+ whyWasICalled);
      } // end of method ejbTimeout
    

    Keep in mind that you cannot use the scheduler API to schedule tasks for EJB-based timers or use the TimerService API to configure WAS TaskHandlers.

    For further information on the scheduler service, see the following URL: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/ws60help/index.jsp?topic=/ com.ibm.websphere.express.doc/info/exp/ae/welc6tech_sch.html.

    Transactional Enhancements and EJB Entity Bean Extension

    In this section I will discuss some extensions that deal with transactions, such as single phase resources inside an XA transaction. I will also discuss some extensions to entity beans, such as dynamic query and application profiles.

    Last Participant Support
    One of the major motivations behind J2EE application servers is the ability to provide enterprise applications with a transaction manager that can coordinate transactions across multiple resources. J2EE application server can coordinate transactions across multiple resources as long as they support the XA specification. In a perfect world, all back end resources would have support for XA. However, since this is not a perfect world, this is not the case. There are some back end systems that do not support XA. For example, distributed platforms often communicate with legacy systems that do not support XA, such as IBM? CICS? systems.

    Ordinarily, all participants in a two-phase commit process must be two-phase commit-capable. With the last participant support (LPS), you can use a single one-phase commit (1PC)-capable resource with any number of two-phase commit (2PC)-capable resources in the same global transaction. The global transaction commit processing still takes place in two phases. In phase one, all the two-phase commit resources are prepared using the two-phase commit protocol. During phase two, the one-phase commit resource is called to commit first if all the two-phase resources successfully prepared. This way, if the 1PC resource fails, WAS can simply roll back the other resources. On the other hand, if the 1PC commit resource succeeds, WAS can commit the remaining resources. Figure 5 illustrates the process.

    Keep in mind that LPS is not a complete substitute for using a resource that fully supports 2PC. It should only be used when you want to commit a one-phase capable resource (that has no 2PC support) with other 2PC resources and you want to get as close to 2PC as possible. LPS introduces a hazard of a mixed commit result because 1PC resources can't completely participate in the 2PC protocol. For example, if the WAS doesn't get a response from the 1PC resource, it has no way of knowing the status. Thus, WAS can't know whether the 1PC resource committed or not and thus does not know how to proceed. In this case, manual intervention will be required to resolve the state of the data in the 1PC resource. No special programming is needed to use LPS; it only needs to be enabled using WebSphere Application Server administration.

    For more information on last participant support, see http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/ws60help/index.jsp?topic=/ com.ibm.websphere.express.doc/info/exp/lao/ref/rla_rlinks.html.

    Activity Sessions
    With LPS, you can only have at most one nonphase capable resource in your XA transaction. However, if you have multiple one-phase capable resources and you need some level of coordination between them, WAS provides the activity session service. Activity sessions extend the JTA transaction model by providing an alternative unit of work to deal with 1PC. Activity sessions provide several features:

    1.  Client-side demarcation of and coordination of multiple one-phase units of work: The activity session service captures the commit operations of each local and global transaction and upholds them. At the end of the activity session, the container will go back and commit (or roll back) each individual transaction. Keep in mind that the activity session, like LPS, is no substitute for two-phase commitment control, when it comes to data integrity. An activity session may result in a mixed outcome, if some of the single phase resources successfully get committed before another resource fails to commit. In that case, the activity session service will allow the programmer to retrieve the list of resources that were committed and those whose state is uncertain.
    2.  Distributed context distribution using the OMG activity service: In order to support a declarative model, activity sessions define propagation of activity sessions from one component to another. The activity session context propagates according to the standards defined by the OMG activity service. See JSR 95 description at www.jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=95.
    3.  Extensions to local transaction support: WebSphere Application Server supports the notion of local transaction containment (LTC), which allowed the container to deal with unresolved resource manager local transactions and the resources associated with them. An LTC is created by default when an XA transaction is absent. Activity sessions can be used to extend the life of an LTC.
    4.  Extended entity bean life cycle support: The entity EJB can then be configured to be activated at the activity session boundaries, rather than at the transaction boundaries. The container will then keep the entity EJB active for the duration of the activity session - which corresponds to the duration of the unit of work - but no global transaction is needed to achieve this result. We often refer to this scenario as the "Commit option C plus" in that it offers a nice compromise between option C and option A by allowing the client to closely control the activation boundaries without resorting to XA transactions all the time.
    5.  Association of activity session with HttpSession to scope contexts to the life cycle of HTTP clients: You can scope an activity session to an HTTP session to help scope the life of activity sessions in Web applications. This is a powerful concept that allows you to mimic user level transactions which are made up of multiple resource transactions. Combined with the extended dntity bean life cycle support, you can interact with entity bean data without them reloading for the life of an activity session. This technique makes it possible to implement some long-running transaction semantics.

    There are two approaches to implementing activity sessions in your applications: the declarative (or container-managed) approach and the programmatic (or bean managed) approach. The programming model for activity sessions and the terminology which relates to the activity session service closely resemble the standard definitions that apply to transaction management, making it simple for a J2EE programmer to become familiar with the activity session semantics. Activity session scopes can be defined either through declarations that apply to EJB methods invocations (in a very similar way as for declarative demarcation of transactions) or servlets - or programmatically, using the UserActivitySession APIs - which are semantically very similar to the standard UserTransaction APIs.

    Figure 6 shows an example of a scenario. Here you have two different entity beans each mapped to a different 1PC resource. The EJB methods are demarcated much like you would regular transactions only using ActivityService demarcations.

    Activity sessions are not just bound to local resources. They can even be used to group multiple 2PC.

    Activity sessions are being worked on for future versions of J2EE as JSR 95: J2EE TM Activity Service for Extended Transactions (URL).

    For more information on the activity service, see: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/ws60help/index.jsp?topic=/ com.ibm.websphere.express.doc/info/exp/ae/welc6tech_as.html.

    Other Entity Bean Enhancements
    Websphere Application Server v6 adds some enhancements to entity beans:

    1.  Dynamic query support: The current EJB 2.1 specification only allows you to define EJB QL statically in the EJB deployment descriptor. However, there are times when an application needs to construct a query dynamically. The dynamic query service provides an API you can use to pass EJB QL at runtime. The dynamic query service is automatically deployed on WAS as a stateless session bean with a local and remote interface. Dynamic queries is being worked on as part of EJB 3.0.

    For more information on dynamic query, see: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/ws60help/index.jsp?topic=/ com.ibm.websphere.express.doc/info/exp/ae/welc6tech_que.html.
    2.  Extensions to EJB QL: WAS version 6 provides several extensions to EJB QL to meet real application requirements. Some examples include: querying business bean methods, dependent values, and multiple element selects.
    3.  Application profiles: WAS uses the notion of access intents on entity beans to define things such as isolation level and lazy loading of collection-based data. In WASv5, an entity bean method could only be assigned one access intent. If an entity bean needed to be accessed by different session beans that had different access intent requirements, you needed to define multiple methods that access the same data or sometimes even create new entity beans mapped to the same data with different access intents. Application profiles allow me to create multiple access intents on the same entity bean method and mark the calling session beans with a particular task. Based on the container task of the session bean, the entity bean will use the correct access intent for the particular use case. This allows entity beans to be more reusable across various data access requirements.

    For more information on application profiles, see: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/ws60help/index.jsp?topic=/ com.ibm.websphere.express.doc/info/exp/ae/welc6tech_appprof.html.

    Other PMEs

    We will briefly review some more WAS 6 PMEs and provide links where you can find more information.

    WorkArea Service
    The J2EE specification defines a component style of development. Components share data by passing information through well defined interfaces. Certain information, however, gets passed automatically. For example, transactional components such as Enterprise JavaBean components pass a transactional context to each other. Another example is a servlet that can propagate a security context to a stateless session bean. Developers do not have to pass transactional or security handles from one component to another, even when calling remote session beans. J2EE application servers pass this information along transparently. However, most other data traditionally needs to be passed through interfaces. Certain data, however, could benefit from automatic propagation. Usually any data that is needed by many components (for example, profile data about a user) is a good candidate for automatic propagation. Rather than populating every interface with the same information, it would be nice if you could propagate this frequently used information using some J2EE context.

    WAS version 6 provides this function through the WorkArea service. By using a simple API, components can pass context information from component to component without passing it directly through programmatic interface. The WorkArea service will propagate to local components using thread local storage and it will pass data to remote components through IIOP. Work areas can be nested as well to allow flexibility of layering your code correctly.

    A client component can create a UserWork area:

    	
    //Lookup UserWorkArea
    UserWorkArea workArea =  (UserWorkArea) ctx.lookup("java:comp/websphere/UserWorkArea");
    
    //create workArea
    workArea.begin("Profile");
    workArea.set("Name","Luke Skywalker");
    workArea.set("Age",new Integer(28));
    
    //call component
    myEJB.callService(params);
    
    //complete workArea
    workArea.complete();
    

    The target component can then access the UserWorkarea to obtain the information.

    
    void callService() throws SomeException
    {
    InitialContext ctx = new InitialContext();
    	//lookup WorkArea
    UserWorkArea workArea =
    (UserWorkArea) ctx.lookup("java:comp/websphere/UserWorkArea");
    
    	//Access Data
    System.out.println("Work Area");
    	System.out.println("Name : " + workArea.get("Name"));
    	System.out.println("Age : " + workArea.get("Age"));
    }
    

    IBM is leading JSR 149 for adding WorkArea support to the J2EE specification.

    You can find more information about the WorkArea service at: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/ws60help/index.jsp?topic=/ com.ibm.websphere.base.doc/info/aes/ae/welc6tech_wa.html.

    Internationalization Service
    Many applications require Internationalization(i18n) support. In most cases, developers can rely on using resource bundles to display data in different languages or regions. However, some i18n requirements are more than just displaying data; applications may need to alter business logic depending on the locale of the user. For example, based on what country you logged in on, an application may need to provide different tax rules. In order to be able to do this, an application would need to get some information about the locale or time zone of the user to properly handle the logic correctly. One could use the WorkArea service to pass i18n, however, having i18n data passed in a special way can benefit greatly. Consider another case where a company needs to develop an internationalized application that is meant to be deployed in various countries. Depending in which country the application is deployed, applications require certain portions of the application to run logic differently. Rather than maintaining different code bases, the i18n service can also be used to determine the locale of the server. This allows applications to deal with both their local i18n context and the caller's i18n context separately. The i18n service allows applications to access both the caller's i18n information as well as the local servers transparently.

    The i18n service in WAS 6 allows applications to access the i18n context of the caller:

    
    UserInternationalization i18nService = (UserInternationalization) ctx.lookup("java:comp/websphere/UserInternationalization");
    
    Internationalization callerI18n = i18nService.getCallerInternationalization();
    

    The i18n service also allows applications to access the i18n context of the running environment:

    
    UserInternationalization i18nService =
    (UserInternationalization) ctx.lookup(
    "java:comp/websphere/UserInternationalization");
    
    InvocationInternationalization invI18n =
    i18nService.getInvocationInternationalization();
    

    IBM is working on standardizing the i18n service through JSR 150.

    More information can be found at: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/ws60help/index.jsp?topic=/ com.ibm.websphere.base.doc/info/aes/ae/welc6tech_in.html.

    Object Pools
    J2EE application servers provide pooling for Enterprise JavaBean components as well as resources such as JDBC connections. However, there are times when applications need to pool plain Java objects. Many times developers spend time developing their own object pools or invest in some third party library. WAS provides an object pool that can pool any arbitrary set of objects. The object pool can be configured through the WAS administrative console or through any supported WAS administrative client.

    More information about object pools can be found at: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/ws60help/index.jsp?topic=/ com.ibm.websphere.base.doc/info/aes/ae/welc6tech_objp.html.

    Startup Beans
    Most applications require some sort of initialization. For example, an application may need to cache some read only data for fast access. This data can be initialized at start up. In the Web container, this can be done by marking a servlet for start up in the web.xml file. However, in the EJB container, start up logic can be challenging. The J2EE specification does not define a way to handle start up logic in the EJB container. WAS provides startup beans that can be used to accomplish start up logic in the EJB container.

    More information can be found about startup beans at: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/ws60help/index.jsp?topic=/ com.ibm.websphere.base.doc/info/aes/ae/welc6tech_sub.html.

    Dynamic Cache
    The dynamic cache service is a whole caching infrastructure. It is a large topic and requires its own paper. My book (referenced at the end of this article) has a whole chapter on this topic. In short, the dynamic cache service improves performance by caching the output of servlets, commands, Web services, and JSP files. Dynamic caching features include replication of cache entries, cache disk offload, Edge-Side Include caching, Web services, and external caching.

    More information on dynamic cache service can be found at: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/ws60help/index.jsp?topic=/ com.ibm.websphere.base.doc/info/aes/ae/welc6tech_dyn.html.

    Conclusion

    This article provided an overview of many of the WAS programming model extensions. There are certainly other extensions not addressed in this article. For example, there are more extensions in the area of SOA, such as the Web Service Gateway or Service Data Objects (SDO). This article tries to provide the PMEs that were previously only available in the Enterprise Edition (WBI SF) of WAS. Now, all WebSphere Application Server customers can use these enterprise class PMEs to fulfill their enterprise requirements.

    Acknowledgments

    Thanks to Billy Newport, Chris Johnson, and Bruce Clay for reviewing this document.

    References

  • IBM WebSphere: Deployment and Advanced Configuration (by Roland Barcia, Tom Alcott, Bill Hines, and Keys Botzum) www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0131468626/qid=1106108458/ sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/103-0795483-2226208?v=glance&s=books
  • Migrating WebLogic Startup Code to WebSphere Application Server www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/websphere/library/ techarticles/0401_beaton/0401_beaton.html
  • Specifications: service data objects, work managers, and timers www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-commonj-sdowmt/index.html
  • Introduction to service sata objects: www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-sdo/index.html
  • Static and dynamic caching in WebSphere Application Server: www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/websphere/techjournal/0405_hines/0405_hines.html
  • More Stories By Roland Barcia

    Roland Barcia is a consulting IT specialist for IBM Software Services for WebSphere in the New York/New Jersey Metro area. He is the author of one of the most popular article series on the developerWorks WebSphere site, www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/websphere/techjournal/0401_barcia/barcia.html, and is also a coauthor of IBM WebSphere: Deployment and Advanced Configuration. You can find more information about him at http://web.njit.edu/~rb54

    Comments (2) View Comments

    Share your thoughts on this story.

    Add your comment
    You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

    In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


    Most Recent Comments
    Simon Birch 04/07/08 01:16:28 AM EDT

    Good article, but is the statement, "it is illegal to create your own threads in a J2EE container", 100% correct? I am not saying that it's not - I would just like to know the answer. I have heard many people say that J2EE applications should not spawn threads, but I can not find any documentation stating this in the Java 2 Platform Enterprise Edition Specification. The Enterprise JavaBeans Specification, Version 2.1, does explicitly say that an enterprise bean must not attempt to manage threads. So, this would lead me to believe that a J2EE application can spawn threads.

    Simon Birch 04/07/08 01:15:35 AM EDT

    Good article, but is the statement, "it is illegal to create your own threads in a J2EE container", 100% correct? I am not saying that it's not - I would just like to know the answer. I have heard many people say that J2EE applications should not spawn threads, but I can not find any documentation stating this in the Java 2 Platform Enterprise Edition Specification. The Enterprise JavaBeans Specification, Version 2.1, does explicitly say that an enterprise bean must not attempt to manage threads. So, this would lead me to believe that a J2EE application can spawn threads.

    Also, if you must have a reason why threads would be used, then imagine that ten calls must be made to a server to retrieve values that are not dependent on each other. It would make sense to do these ten calls asynchronously.

    @ThingsExpo Stories
    All major researchers estimate there will be tens of billions devices - computers, smartphones, tablets, and sensors - connected to the Internet by 2020. This number will continue to grow at a rapid pace for the next several decades. With major technology companies and startups seriously embracing IoT strategies, now is the perfect time to attend @ThingsExpo, November 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Learn what is going on, contribute to the discussions, and ensure that your enterprise is as "IoT-Ready" as it can be.
    Containers are not new, but renewed commitments to performance, flexibility, and agility have propelled them to the top of the agenda today. By working without the need for virtualization and its overhead, containers are seen as the perfect way to deploy apps and services across multiple clouds. Containers can handle anything from file types to operating systems and services, including microservices. What are microservices? Unlike what the name implies, microservices are not necessarily small, but are focused on specific tasks. The ability for developers to deploy multiple containers – thous...
    Too often with compelling new technologies market participants become overly enamored with that attractiveness of the technology and neglect underlying business drivers. This tendency, what some call the “newest shiny object syndrome,” is understandable given that virtually all of us are heavily engaged in technology. But it is also mistaken. Without concrete business cases driving its deployment, IoT, like many other technologies before it, will fade into obscurity.
    The 3rd International WebRTC Summit, to be held Nov. 4–6, 2014, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, announces that its Call for Papers is now open. Topics include all aspects of improving IT delivery by eliminating waste through automated business models leveraging cloud technologies. WebRTC Summit is co-located with 15th International Cloud Expo, 6th International Big Data Expo, 3rd International DevOps Summit and 2nd Internet of @ThingsExpo. WebRTC (Web-based Real-Time Communication) is an open source project supported by Google, Mozilla and Opera that aims to enable bro...
    As more and more data is generated from a variety of connected devices, the need to get insights from this data and predict future behavior and trends is increasingly essential for businesses. Real-time stream processing is needed in a variety of different industries such as Manufacturing, Oil and Gas, Automobile, Finance, Online Retail, Smart Grids, and Healthcare. Azure Stream Analytics is a fully managed distributed stream computation service that provides low latency, scalable processing of streaming data in the cloud with an enterprise grade SLA. It features built-in integration with Azur...
    SYS-CON Events announced today that HPM Networks will exhibit at the 17th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on November 3–5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. For 20 years, HPM Networks has been integrating technology solutions that solve complex business challenges. HPM Networks has designed solutions for both SMB and enterprise customers throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.
    With the proliferation of connected devices underpinning new Internet of Things systems, Brandon Schulz, Director of Luxoft IoT – Retail, will be looking at the transformation of the retail customer experience in brick and mortar stores in his session at @ThingsExpo. Questions he will address include: Will beacons drop to the wayside like QR codes, or be a proximity-based profit driver? How will the customer experience change in stores of all types when everything can be instrumented and analyzed? As an area of investment, how might a retail company move towards an innovation methodolo...
    SYS-CON Events announced today the Containers & Microservices Bootcamp, being held November 3-4, 2015, in conjunction with 17th Cloud Expo, @ThingsExpo, and @DevOpsSummit at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. This is your chance to get started with the latest technology in the industry. Combined with real-world scenarios and use cases, the Containers and Microservices Bootcamp, led by Janakiram MSV, a Microsoft Regional Director, will include presentations as well as hands-on demos and comprehensive walkthroughs.
    Contrary to mainstream media attention, the multiple possibilities of how consumer IoT will transform our everyday lives aren’t the only angle of this headline-gaining trend. There’s a huge opportunity for “industrial IoT” and “Smart Cities” to impact the world in the same capacity – especially during critical situations. For example, a community water dam that needs to release water can leverage embedded critical communications logic to alert the appropriate individuals, on the right device, as soon as they are needed to take action.
    WebRTC services have already permeated corporate communications in the form of videoconferencing solutions. However, WebRTC has the potential of going beyond and catalyzing a new class of services providing more than calls with capabilities such as mass-scale real-time media broadcasting, enriched and augmented video, person-to-machine and machine-to-machine communications. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Luis Lopez, CEO of Kurento, will introduce the technologies required for implementing these ideas and some early experiments performed in the Kurento open source software community in areas ...
    SYS-CON Events announced today that Pythian, a global IT services company specializing in helping companies leverage disruptive technologies to optimize revenue-generating systems, has been named “Bronze Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 17th Cloud Expo, which will take place on November 3–5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Founded in 1997, Pythian is a global IT services company that helps companies compete by adopting disruptive technologies such as cloud, Big Data, advanced analytics, and DevOps to advance innovation and increase agility. Specializing in designing, imple...
    Consumer IoT applications provide data about the user that just doesn’t exist in traditional PC or mobile web applications. This rich data, or “context,” enables the highly personalized consumer experiences that characterize many consumer IoT apps. This same data is also providing brands with unprecedented insight into how their connected products are being used, while, at the same time, powering highly targeted engagement and marketing opportunities. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Nathan Treloar, President and COO of Bebaio, will explore examples of brands transforming their businesses by t...
    In his session at @ThingsExpo, Lee Williams, a producer of the first smartphones and tablets, will talk about how he is now applying his experience in mobile technology to the design and development of the next generation of Environmental and Sustainability Services at ETwater. He will explain how M2M controllers work through wirelessly connected remote controls; and specifically delve into a retrofit option that reverse-engineers control codes of existing conventional controller systems so they don't have to be replaced and are instantly converted to become smart, connected devices.
    With the Apple Watch making its way onto wrists all over the world, it’s only a matter of time before it becomes a staple in the workplace. In fact, Forrester reported that 68 percent of technology and business decision-makers characterize wearables as a top priority for 2015. Recognizing their business value early on, FinancialForce.com was the first to bring ERP to wearables, helping streamline communication across front and back office functions. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Kevin Roberts, GM of Platform at FinancialForce.com, will discuss the value of business applications on wearable ...
    SYS-CON Events announced today that Micron Technology, Inc., a global leader in advanced semiconductor systems, will exhibit at the 17th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on November 3–5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Micron’s broad portfolio of high-performance memory technologies – including DRAM, NAND and NOR Flash – is the basis for solid state drives, modules, multichip packages and other system solutions. Backed by more than 35 years of technology leadership, Micron's memory solutions enable the world's most innovative computing, consumer,...
    17th Cloud Expo, taking place Nov 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. Cloud computing is now being embraced by a majority of enterprises of all sizes. Yesterday's debate about public vs. private has transformed into the reality of hybrid cloud: a recent survey shows that 74% of enterprises have a hybrid cloud strategy. Meanwhile, 94% of enterprises are using some form of XaaS – software, platform, and infrastructure as a service.
    As more intelligent IoT applications shift into gear, they’re merging into the ever-increasing traffic flow of the Internet. It won’t be long before we experience bottlenecks, as IoT traffic peaks during rush hours. Organizations that are unprepared will find themselves by the side of the road unable to cross back into the fast lane. As billions of new devices begin to communicate and exchange data – will your infrastructure be scalable enough to handle this new interconnected world?
    While many app developers are comfortable building apps for the smartphone, there is a whole new world out there. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Narayan Sainaney, Co-founder and CTO of Mojio, will discuss how the business case for connected car apps is growing and, with open platform companies having already done the heavy lifting, there really is no barrier to entry.
    SYS-CON Events announced today that the "Second Containers & Microservices Expo" will take place November 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. Containers and microservices have become topics of intense interest throughout the cloud developer and enterprise IT communities.
    Manufacturing connected IoT versions of traditional products requires more than multiple deep technology skills. It also requires a shift in mindset, to realize that connected, sensor-enabled “things” act more like services than what we usually think of as products. In his session at @ThingsExpo, David Friedman, CEO and co-founder of Ayla Networks, will discuss how when sensors start generating detailed real-world data about products and how they’re being used, smart manufacturers can use the data to create additional revenue streams, such as improved warranties or premium features. Or slash...